Got Water? How to Achieve Optimal Pet Hydration This Summer

Many animal species evolved in such a way that reduced the need for water. Camels, for example, can survive over a month in the desert as long as they eat enough vegetation. But the lionshare of animal species absolutely depend on fresh, clean water in order for their bodies to function properly.  

With summer temperatures rising, July has been designated National Pet Hydration Month. Since as much as 80% of a pet’s body weight is water, it is critical to measure and observe how much water they drink this summer. Together, the Pet Experts hope to keep your pet healthy and hydrated!

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Science Says: Relaxing With Your Pet Is Great for Your Health (and Theirs!)

Relaxing with your pet is great for pet health!

When people closely interact with their pets, they experience a spike in the powerful “love hormone”, oxytocin. Oxytocin is well-known to nursing human mothers and people that tightly embrace loved ones, but it may be surprising that animals experience the positive effects, too.

As a result, when relaxing with your pet, say, during a great weekend couch snuggle, the boons to your health are quite amazing. What’s more is that your pet experiences the good vibes, too. Win-win!

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Common 4th of July Dangers for Pets

While you are enjoying fireworks, barbeques, good friends, and fun times this holiday, don’t forget to be on the lookout for the following potential hazards for your pets:

  • Neighbors & friends – Keep a close eye on your pets if you take them to parties or have people over.  Just because you realize that bratwurst might cause digestive upset for your pet doesn’t mean your neighbor does.  Also, unfamiliar visitors and crowds can make it easy for frightened or curious pets to slip out the door.  Make sure that your pet has a “safe” quiet place to retreat to and be sure it is wearing identification with current contact information.
  • Not-so-pet friendly treats – Do your best to keep your pet on its normal diet.  Extra treats and fatty food can cause vomiting and/or diarrhea at minimum, and could even result in more severe digestive problems like pancreatitis.  Some “people” treats such as alcohol, onions, chocolate, and grapes or raisins could even result in death.
  • Fireworks and other hazards – Obviously fireworks and other direct flames can be dangerous to pets.  Be sure to keep them secured and out of the way when such activities are occurring.  But did you think about the loud noises a fireworks display may cause?  Scared pets may hide or worse, try to run from the noise.  If your pet has severe anxiety related to fireworks, talk to your veterinarian about potentially using a sedative to help get them through the holiday.

For those of you who are dealing with fireworks anxiety, be sure to enter our sister hospital’s Thunder Shirt sweepstakes!