10 Tips for Easy Leash Walking

Does your dog pull you along every time you try to walk them? Or, do they plop down obstinately on their butt when they want to go down a different street?

Many pets can prove to be stubborn when it comes to walking on a leash; but often that stubbornness can stem from a lack of training on how to walk on a leash.

The Pet Experts at Elmhurst Animal Care Center have a few tricks up our sleeve for easy leash walking to get your pet on the move.

The Pet Expert’s Tips for Easy Leash Walking

If your pet needs the basic skills to successfully walk on a leash, we highly recommend training and socialization first. It can help ease your pet into loose leash walking, along with reinforcing those important basic commands.

If your pet has been trained but needs some help walking on a leash without pulling or becoming distracted, we recommend these simple tips.

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Hold your hounds! Leash etiquette for your pooch.

Dog Pulling at LeashWe have all experienced it:  You are minding your own business, walking your dog quietly when a friendly, over-excited (or not-so-friendly, borderline aggressive) dog pulling an owner at the end of a leash comes barreling into your personal space.

Worst case scenario, your dog is not so thrilled at the sight of the other dog, or the other dog is not as thrilled as its owner perceives and chaos ensues.  Best case scenario, one or both dogs, although friendly, develop bad habits regarding interactions with other humans and dogs.  Keep the following cardinal rules of leash etiquette in mind when taking your dog in public:

  1. Not all dogs are friendly.  Even if your dog is, be sure to give other pets plenty of “personal” space unless you ask the owner’s permission to approach.
  2. Not all people like all dogs.  Another dog walker may be terrified of your dog.  Don’t allow your pet to jump on or rush at others.
  3. Consider ditching the flexi-lead.  While it’s convenient to let your dog roam, it is impossible to maintain control of your pet while on a flexi-lead.  They are also much less sturdy and more likely to break in times of need.
  4. If you do use a flexi-lead, keep it locked at 6 feet when other people or dogs are around.
  5. Train your pup!  Exuberant, friendly dogs and cautious, fearful dogs alike benefit from training sessions.

Contact us if you’d like some recommendations for local trainers.